?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous Entry | Next Entry

Seventeen by Hearst Corporation

Title Seventeen
Editor-In-Chief Ann Shoket
Company Hearst Corporation
Issue November 2010
ISSN 0037-301X

Teaser/Reader Annotation Seventeen is the magazine for the fashion inspired teen to turn to for the latest in

Plot Summary Seventeen has been around since 1944 and has been considered one of the premiere magazines for young girls. It features in your face advertisements, the latest hair and makeup tips, fashion advice, and budgeting based off a teenager's average, higher-end price range. Many of the fashion pages feature styles directing readers to which of the selections would be the best fit for her body type. There were also articles focusing on healthy diet and exercise plans designed for the female teenager. Bringing these health issues into the content is especially important when obesity is one of the most overwhelming health problems in the country. All of it is arranged in a purposefully chaotic fashion to appeal the the teen reader. This particular issue featured Ke$ha on the cover with an article talking about herself - beyond the image that she presents and the relationships she has had. Though the abstract on the cover claimed the article would discuss her infamous party background, it did not deliver within the article.

Critical Evaluation Unlike Teen Vogue which works to incorporate deeper issues, Seventeen does not go much further than telling readers who and what is in style and how much it is going to cost them to develop same look. In order to counteract this a little bit, however, they feature an article in each issue called “17 ––” which features a deeper, real life issue such as global warming or rape. The depth of the issue varies each time, though. The tone throughout the magazine is positive and cheerful, almost going overboard on the girl power message. While the models used were prominently Caucasian, it did not appear to be too heavily biased. There was also a number of quizes and embarrassing stories scattered throughout the magazine, knowing that their primary audience is not adults and enjoy the bits of fun breaking up the reading. What I did not understand was why the magazine was featuring Ke$ha – who is in her twenties and singing about issues such as drinking and partying – instead of a teenaged celebrity that would be more relateable for young girls.

About the Editor-In-Chief Ann Shoket (June 16, 1972) is an American magazine writer and editor. She graduated from high school in Pennsylvania before attending New York University for her Bachelor's degree. Shoket earned a certificate in Media Management from The New School.

Shoket worked as a reporter for a time befor creating the webzine Tag for artists and writers. As a senior editor she has worked for both CosmoGIRL! and Seventeen. She succeeded Atoosa Rubenstein as editor-in-chief in January 2007.

Primary Genre Fashion

Curriculum Ties N/A

Booktalking Ideas

Do you think Seventeen is losing its relativity to teenage girls as it tries to focus on what the media believes readers should be interested in?

Should Seventeen feature more of the deep articles or is it a good mixture as is?

Reading Level/Interest Age Grade 9+

Challenge Issues None.

1) Become familiar with book and its content.
2) Refer to library's collection policies.
3) Refer to professional reviews.
4) Refer to the ALA Library Bill of Rights.

Why is it included? This is a very long running teen magazine and a feature in my public library's collection.