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Teen Vogue by Condé Nast Publications

Title Teen Vogue
Editor-In-Chief Amy Astley
Company Condé Nast Publications
Issue December/January 2010
ISSN 1540-2215

Teaser/Reader Annotation Teen Vogue is the premier magazine for the aspiring fashionable teen. It goes beyond the clothes and make up to talk about prevalent issues.

Plot Summary The long-time running magazine Vogue had a large audience but realized that there was a section of the market they were not able to adequately represent – the teenager. From this, Teen Vogue came into production with the hopes of catering to the young adults interested in fashion and celebrities. Each month it features information about the latest in entertainment and fashion while also featuring stories on current issues and events. While it does follow many of the basic formats prominent in young adult magazines, it combines them with the recognizable Vogue style as a reminder that it is an offshoot of the glossy, stylized magazine. This particular issue featured Dakota Fanning on the cover promoting her new look, highlighting the fact that she is no longer a wide-eyed child actress. It also covered the hot topic of teen bullying, offering readers advice on how to stand up to it and work through the issue.

Critical Evaluation One of the immediate features of this magazine is the unique cover size. Teen Vogue's marketing team had a fantastic idea when they decided to produce it in smaller dimensions than the typical magazine. It catches the eye and has more visibility on the front of the magazine shelf. Just as its adult counter-part, however, trying to get through the ads to the actual content was quite a daunting experience and attempting to find a certain page was nearly impossible. While it could certainly use a clean-up in that area, it is not a top priority as most readers probably flip through the pages. I was pleasantly surprised to find real world issues mixed in with the expected fashion and makeup advice. The magazine tried to pull deeper subjects into each section so that it was not just a flat experience. In this particular issue, there was an article talking about the humanitarian efforts and volunteer work a top model does when not shooting which reflected the magazine's attempts. Another interesting characteristic of the magazine is a section called “Contributors” which interviews Teen Vogue employees and spotlights their contributions.

About the Editor-In-Chief Amy Astley graduated from the Honors College of Michigan State University with a Bachelor's degree in English Literature. She was an associate editor at HG for four years prior to joining the Vogue team in 1993.

Between 2000 and 2002, Astly worked as the editor for Teen Vogue's four test issues. Her outstanding work caught the eye of the main magazine's editor-in-chief who promoted her in June of 2002. She has held the position through the 2003 launch of the teen magazine to today. She currently lives in Manhattan with her husband and two children.

Primary Genre Fashion

Curriculum Ties N/A

Booktalking Ideas

1) Did the magazine do a good job pulling real world issues into the content?

2) Did this make you think about fashion in a broader sense and connect it to other issues?

Reading Level/Interest Age Grade 9+

Challenge Issues None.

1) Become familiar with book and its content.
2) Refer to library's collection policies.
3) Refer to professional reviews.
4) Refer to the ALA Library Bill of Rights.

Why is it included? This was the most prominent teen magazine available at the local library. It was the only one which got enough use that the library has maintained a constant subscription.